Talk the Talk: Teach Yourself and Others About Breast Health

This action plan takes you through all the crucial steps necessary to bring yourself and others up to speed on breast health, from having “The Talk” and getting tested to learning about breast cancer from those who have lived through the experience.

Talk the Talk: Teach Yourself and Others About Breast Health

Breast Cancer Awareness month in October has become a worldwide phenomenon, holding many meanings for different kinds of people. But, at its core, it’s about getting women to talk – not just about breast cancer, but also about breast health in general. The best way to celebrate this year is by starting a conversation of your own.

As with any sensitive area of the human body, it can be difficult (and awkward) to talk about breast health, especially with a younger person. But staying informed is the best way to prevent issues from arising (or knowing how to address them when they do). And, more often than not, breast education begins among family members and friends at home.

This action plan takes you through all the crucial steps necessary to bring yourself and others up to speed on breast health, from having “The Talk” and getting tested to learning about breast cancer from those who have lived through the experience.

In Collaboration with Ford Warriors in Pink

Have the talk early

Statistics show talking about breast health early encourages women to be more open about the issue throughout their lives. According to one survey, 63% of daughters are more likely to talk about breast health if their mothers bring it up first. Conversely, 55% of mothers admit they’re more likely to have “the conversation” if their daughters are the first to address it. Who brings up breast health with who will depend largely on your personal relationship. The important thing to remember is that, once one of you starts talking, the other will likely want to open up as well.

J&J Vaccine and Blood Clots: What to Know If You Already Got the Shot

Six cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have been reported among the 6.8 million people who received the J&J vaccine.

After the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was associated with cases of "rare and severe" blood clots, the U.S. government recommended officials pause giving the shot. But nearly 7 million people have already received the vaccine. So the news has a lot of people wondering if they should be concerned and what they need to look for.

The short answer: "Don't panic."

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