What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Get the facts about these versatile vegetables.

What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Non-starchy vegetables are a key component in a variety of Dr. Oz’s diets, including The Day-Off Diet, The Total Choice Plan, and most recently in The 21-Day Weight Loss Breakthrough Diet. But what are they exactly? Non-starchy vegetables are vegetables with little to no starch content, a type of complex carbohydrate that breaks down quickly in the body. These types of vegetables are low in calories, low in carbohydrates (making them low-glycemic), and rich in fiber. Find out how they compare against other vegetables and how you can include them in your healthy diet.

More: 10 Ways to Sneak More Veggies Into Your Meals


How Much to Eat

Your recommended vegetable intake varies based on your age, gender, and physical activity level. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend eating “a variety of vegetables from all of the five vegetable subgroups — dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and other [vegetables]. These include all fresh, frozen, canned, and dried options in cooked or raw forms, including vegetable juices. The recommended amount of vegetables in the Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern at the 2,000-calorie level is 2 1/2 cup-equivalents of vegetables per day.” Get started with these non-starchy vegetable recipes.

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