What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Get the facts about these versatile vegetables.

What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Non-starchy vegetables are a key component in a variety of Dr. Oz’s diets, including The Day-Off Diet, The Total Choice Plan, and most recently in The 21-Day Weight Loss Breakthrough Diet. But what are they exactly? Non-starchy vegetables are vegetables with little to no starch content, a type of complex carbohydrate that breaks down quickly in the body. These types of vegetables are low in calories, low in carbohydrates (making them low-glycemic), and rich in fiber. Find out how they compare against other vegetables and how you can include them in your healthy diet.

More: 10 Ways to Sneak More Veggies Into Your Meals


Non-Starchy vs. Starchy Vegetables

Starchy vegetables include vegetables such as beans, butternut squash, corn, parsnips, peas, plantains, potatoes, and pumpkins. They are rich in carbohydrates that the body needs but since they break down slowly, they can raise blood sugar levels during the process. This is important to consider if you have a condition such as diabetes which requires that you maintain a low blood sugar level as often as possible. In addition, many of us already consume plenty of starchy vegetables but not enough non-starchy vegetables on a regular basis. To balance blood sugar levels and keep the body healthy, it’s crucial to eat both starchy and non-starchy vegetables.

Watch: The Foods That Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Exactly How to De-Escalate Aggression From a Stranger

Follow security Expert Bill Staton's important advice to keep yourself safe.

Have you ever had a tense interaction with a stranger in public? Perhaps your shopping carts accidentally knocked into each other or there was a misunderstanding in communication and the other person gets angry. You may wonder how you can de-escalate the aggression and exit the situation safely. So security expert Bill Stanton has your go-to advice for staying alert and protecting yourself in the face of verbal aggression and physical attacks.

THE INITIAL INTERACTION

Bill Stanton: "It always starts with something small, like someone being too close to you, or even more common, you get bumped by a shopping cart. You want to look at their eyes first -it may reveal emotional changes. But you can't rely on just that. Look at what their trunk is doing; a person's torso will reveal their intent. Body language like raising hands, heightened expression, tense shoulders — these are natural responses to a person who is feeling threatened and will escalate. They may begin to zero in on the space between you and them, and their voice will get louder and louder. You want to read this before it gets further and becomes explosive."

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