What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Get the facts about these versatile vegetables.

What You Need to Know About Non-Starchy Veggies

Non-starchy vegetables are a key component in a variety of Dr. Oz’s diets, including The Day-Off Diet, The Total Choice Plan, and most recently in The 21-Day Weight Loss Breakthrough Diet. But what are they exactly? Non-starchy vegetables are vegetables with little to no starch content, a type of complex carbohydrate that breaks down quickly in the body. These types of vegetables are low in calories, low in carbohydrates (making them low-glycemic), and rich in fiber. Find out how they compare against other vegetables and how you can include them in your healthy diet.

More: 10 Ways to Sneak More Veggies Into Your Meals


The Benefits of Non-Starchy Vegetables

Eating non-starchy vegetables will fill you up and keep you satisfied until your next meal. They’re great options for both main entrees or as simple snacks. Like other vegetables, non-starchy vegetables are packed with antioxidants and essential nutrients, and they all count toward your daily recommended vegetable intake. Consuming vegetables, along with fruits, have been shown to reduce the risk of developing chronic health conditions and diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease.

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