13 Cancer-Fighting Foods

Fill up on these ingredients to fend off cancer.

13 Cancer-Fighting Foods

Doctors have yet to find a definitive link between cancer and food. What they have found, however, is a correlation between certain diets — such as the Mediterranean Diet — and the potential for cancer reduction. Doctors call these diets (often specific to a culture or geographical region) anti-angiogenic, which means that they cut off the blood supply of cancerous tumors, starving them of the nutrients they need to grow. Here's a list of ingredients that are staples of anti-angiogenic diets.

Watch: Common Cancer Myths – Busted!


Maitake Mushrooms

Maitake mushrooms have anti-inflammatory properties. In Chinese culture, they're used to treat diabetes and hypertension. Science shows that these mushrooms feed the body a natural chemical called beta-glucan, which stimulates cells in the immune system and in effect, can slow the growth of cancerous tumors. Try this recipe for a steamy, zesty Maitake mushroom stir fry, perfectly seasoned with garlic, lemon, and ginger.

Watch: The Vegetable You Need to Cook With More Often

What's Really Causing Your Obesity: Nature or Nurture?

It's more complex than too many calories and not enough physical activity.

The American Medical Association officially recognized obesity as a disease in 2013. But in the past 13 years, there's not been much of a shift in the understanding of what causes obesity — not in the general public, in people who contend with the condition or in the practice of medicine. Most people still think of obesity as a character flaw caused by too many calories and not enough physical activity. But it's much more complex than that.

A study analyzing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data found that even though US adults' BMI increased between 1988 and 2006, the amount of calories adults consumed and the energy they expended were unchanged. It also appears that the quality of calories consumed (low versus high glycemic index) is as important a consideration as the total quantity. And genetics only explains about 2.7% variation in people's weight, according to a study in Nature. That all adds up to this: The two most common explanations for obesity — calories in, calories out and family history — cannot, by themselves, explain the current epidemic.

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