Enter to Win: Aquaphor Product Giveaway

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Enter to Win: Aquaphor Product Giveaway

Choose Aquaphor Healing Ointment®, the #1 dermatologist recommended brand for dry, cracked skin. It’s uniquely formulated to protect, help heal and restore smooth, healthy looking skin. Different from a lotion or cream, this multi-purpose ointment is water-free, and protects and soothes extremely dry skin, chapped lips, cracked hands and feet, minor cuts and burns, and many other dry skin irritations.

Aquaphor® Ointment Body Spray is a breakthrough innovation that immediately soothes, and relieves dry, rough skin all day. The spray is easy to apply and leaves skin feeling soft and smooth. Unlike a spray lotion, the ointment is water-free, and locks in moisture to keep skin hydrated. The spray moisturizer is ideal for arms and legs and even sprays upside down to reach the back. 


For more information visit https://www.aquaphorus.com/body-care-products/

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Internet access required. Promotion is open while supplies last. Open to all legal residents of the 50 United States (including the District of Columbia). Must be at least 18 years of age to enter. Void where prohibited. Total ARV of all prizes is $79,950. See Official Rules at www.doctoroz.com/page/aquaphor-giveaway-october-2018-official-rules SPONSOR: Beiersdorf, Inc., 45 Danbury Road, Wilton CT 06897

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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