Statement from the National Chicken Council on “Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!”

statement

The National Chicken Council (NCC) is aware of the film “Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!” from filmmaker and activist Morgan Spurlock. His latest stunt is an unfortunate and one-sided hit piece on an industry that provides Americans with the healthiest, most sustainable, affordable, and responsibly raised protein in the market. It is clearly told in a story intended for “entertainment” and not based on facts. If you want to spend $15 and 93 minutes of your time to learn that “crispy” really means “fried,” this is the movie for you.

While NCC did not participate in the film’s production, we can say that we’re proud of how U.S. chicken is produced.

Since the movie’s original filming more than three years ago, a lot has changed:

  • The chicken industry launched its transparency campaign – Chicken Check In – to answer questions about chicken production;
  • NCC’s animal welfare guidelines were updated and certified by an independent audit certification organization;
  • All quick service restaurants now post calories on their menus; and
  • The majority of chicken farmers today are thriving and helping to produce America’s #1 protein.

We invite anyone interested in seeing first-hand the real story of broiler chickens to watch NCC’s 360° video series. These videos show chickens’ journey, from their first day in a hatchery to how they’re cared for on the farm. Our members use industry leading and third-party certified animal welfare practices to ensure the birds are raised as healthy as possible. The national flock is as healthy as it’s ever been.

We are also proud to share that the overwhelming majority of the 25,000 farm families who partner with chicken companies are satisfied with their relationship. In fact, almost 95% of all contract farmers are retained year-over-year by the same company, and most companies have waiting lists of farmers wanting to enter a partnership. The ultimate success of the chicken company depends on the farmer.