USANA Visionex®: Enter for a Chance to Win!

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USANA Visionex®: Enter for a Chance to Win!

If you’re like most people, you spend at least eight hours a day in front of a screen. That prolonged exposure can take a toll on your vision.

USANA Visionex® is formulated with powerful antioxidants—lutein, zeaxanthin, and bilberry extract—to help protect the delicate tissues of the eye from photo-oxidation. These ingredients also help maintain the health of the retina. Plus, the vitamin C in Visionex helps maintain the structure of the lens to further protect the future of your eye health.*


Learn more about USANA Visionex® and other high-quality nutritional products.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Internet access required. Promotion open until 9:00 AM ET on April 19, 2017. Open to all legal residents of the 50 United States (including DC) and Canada (excluding Quebec). Must be at least 18 years of age to enter or age of majority in jurisdiction of residence. Void in Quebec and where prohibited. Total ARV of all prizes is $36,250. See Official Rules at https://www.doctoroz.com/page/usana-visionex-april-2017-sweepstakes-official-rules. SPONSOR: USANA Health Sciences, Inc., 3838 W Parkway Blvd, Salt Lake City, UT 84120

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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