How Plant-Based Milks Compare to Dairy Milk: Fat, Calories & Protein

What exactly is in these tasty alternatives to whole milk — and are they smart choices?

How Plant-Based Milks Compare to Dairy Milk: Fat, Calories & Protein

Americans spent more than $2.36 billion dollars in 2020 on plant-based milks! More than $1.5 billion was on almond milk, with oat milk jumping into the second-most popular spot, Once-leader of the pack, soy milk, was third-most popular. So what exactly is in these tasty alternatives to whole milk — and are they smart choices?

Almond Milk

Almond milk contains no saturated fat and 2 g mono- and polyunsaturated fats in an 8-ounce glass. Whole milk delivers 7.37 g of fat, with 4.23 g of saturated fat. Unsweetened almond milk also contains just 30 calories, in contrast to whole milk's 136 calories, and serves up 1 g of protein (whole milk has 8 g), 1 g carbs, 450 mg calcium, 160 mg potassium, 150 mcg vitamin A and 200 IU of vitamin D.


Oat Milk

Oat milk delivers 120 calories, 5 g of fat (0.5 g is sat fat), 3 g protein, 22 g carbs per 8-ounce serving, and 2-3 g fiber, although nutrition label info varies from brand to brand.

Soy Milk

Soy milk's popularity has plummeted because of news that its estrogen-like molecules can raise the risk of breast cancer. The Cleveland Clinic says there's no evidence to support that. A serving of soy milk contains 131 calories, 4.3 g fat with 0.5 g sat fat, 15 g carbs, 8 g protein and whatever added vitamins from the manufacturer; the USDA's[7] evaluation says soy milk offers no vitamin A or D.

Bottom Line

Always opt for unsweetened alternative milks, which ever you choose. And experiment with newer options, like pea, pecan, walnut, and cashew milk.

Exactly How to De-Escalate Aggression From a Stranger

Follow security Expert Bill Staton's important advice to keep yourself safe.

Have you ever had a tense interaction with a stranger in public? Perhaps your shopping carts accidentally knocked into each other or there was a misunderstanding in communication and the other person gets angry. You may wonder how you can de-escalate the aggression and exit the situation safely. So security expert Bill Stanton has your go-to advice for staying alert and protecting yourself in the face of verbal aggression and physical attacks.

THE INITIAL INTERACTION

Bill Stanton: "It always starts with something small, like someone being too close to you, or even more common, you get bumped by a shopping cart. You want to look at their eyes first -it may reveal emotional changes. But you can't rely on just that. Look at what their trunk is doing; a person's torso will reveal their intent. Body language like raising hands, heightened expression, tense shoulders — these are natural responses to a person who is feeling threatened and will escalate. They may begin to zero in on the space between you and them, and their voice will get louder and louder. You want to read this before it gets further and becomes explosive."

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