Making Sense of Newtown: "The Dr. Oz Show" To Help America Cope With Friday’s Tragedy

Special Broadcast Monday, December 17, Examines Post-Traumatic Stress of a Nation And How to Heal After the Unthinkable.

(New York) - As our nation reels from the terrible events in Newtown, Conn., The Dr. Oz Show will offer a special broadcast Monday, December 17, that will examine the issues many people face upon learning of the shooting on Friday. 


Because of the unique scale and horror of the murders, it’s normal for people to be deeply affected by the news – and to experience painful and potentially dangerous stress symptoms.  In addition to the physical manifestations of stress, the emotional, psychological and spiritual toll on the nation is great, and other major shootings such as the Aurora movie theater shooting, the Virginia Tech massacre and the Columbine school shooting show us that crisis counseling and other resources are necessary, even for people who are far removed from the actual events.

“We stand in solidarity as a nation with those who are suffering so deeply in Newtown,” said host Mehmet Oz, M.D.  “We will devote Monday’s show to an open discussion to come together and heal as a country and support one another to discuss the healthiest ways to deal with this unspeakable tragedy – physically, emotionally and spiritually.”

The show will tape Monday morning and air in the afternoon in the majority of U.S. markets.  Those cities that regularly air The Dr. Oz Show after 2 p.m. EST will carry the show in its entirety.

General Media Inquiries:

Tim Sullivan

The Dr. Oz Show

TSullivan@zoco.com

212-259-1520

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