Surprising Allergy Triggers

If there’s one thing that can ruin a beautiful day, it’s springtime allergies. More than a nuisance, seasonal allergies can turn you into an irritable, mucus-y mess.

A recent survey shows that allergy symptoms can make us feel unattractive, moody and anti-social. But before you don the Hazmat suit or hole up in your house all spring, Myron Zitt, M.D., past president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) warns that your daily habits could be the reason you’re suffering so much.


Check out these five surprising culprits that can make allergies flare – and find out what you can do to stop them.

Provided by YouBeauty

Fruit and Nuts

During hay-fever season, eating certain fruits and nuts can cause an allergic reaction called pollen-food allergy syndrome. Consider it a case of mistaken identity. When pollen counts are high, your body is ultra-sensitive to anything that resembles your allergen, and unfortunately, the proteins in fruits and pollen are like Mary-Kate to Ashley, explains Jacqueline Eghrari-Sabet, M.D., founder of Family Allergy and Asthma Care in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

For example, people with birch or alder tree allergies may swell up from munching on apples, carrots, celery, hazelnuts, peaches, cherries and pears. Also, grass allergies could cause a reaction to eating tomatoes. If you don’t want to give up your favorite fruit, cooking or peeling it usually solves the problem, suggests Dr. Eghrari-Sabet.

After years of trying to get pregnant, doctors told Kelsi Pierce it would be near impossible for her to conceive a child. However, Kelsi got the surprise of her life when her mom volunteered to be her surrogate — and she found out she, too, was pregnant!