6 Health Benefits of Magnesium

Find out why adding magnesium to your diet can do your body good.

6 Health Benefits of Magnesium

Magnesium has been in the spotlight lately and getting a lot of attention from health experts. This mineral plays a role in the physiological functions of the brain, heart, and muscles. Researchers continue to study how it can help your health by improving sleep, fighting depression, and reducing the risk of disease. You may want to consider adding a magnesium supplement to your daily routine and eating foods that are rich in magnesium, like leafy greens and pumpkin seeds. As always, make sure to speak to your doctor before making any major health changes. Want to learn more about the benefits? Check out six of the most significant reasons to give magnesium a try.

Watch: Daily Dose: Magnesium


Insomnia

While taking a magnesium supplement daily won’t cause you to conk out as soon as your head hits the pillow, it can help relax your muscles and may have an anti-anxiety effect in the body. Research on an elderly population suffering from sleep problems showed that they had improvements in subjective insomnia, like increasing sleep time and sleep efficiency and reducing early morning waking. The scientific sleep community doesn’t show strong scientific evidence that magnesium supplementation will cure insomnia, but, if you have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, you may find some relief when taking this supplement on a regular basis.

More: 5 Easy Steps to a Better Night's Sleep

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