6 Ways to Fall Asleep Faster Without Melatonin Pills

Get the rest you deserve without having to count sheep.

6 Ways to Fall Asleep Faster Without Melatonin Pills

Sleep is crucial for your overall health and well-being but according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, nearly 25 percent of American adults have reported inadequate sleep for at least 15 out of every 30 days. In addition, an estimated 40 million Americans suffer from a sleep disorder such as insomnia or sleep apnea. If you aren’t getting the quality sleep you need or want to improve your sleep naturally, dietary and lifestyle changes can go a long way in helping you reach your goals. Clinical psychologist Dr. Michael Breus and Dr. Camilo Ruiz, a board-certified internist specializing in sleep medicine, shared their pill-free recommendations for anyone looking to get more rest and relaxation.

Watch: Fall Asleep Instantly With This Pre-Bedtime Technique


Maintain a Healthy Diet

The old adage, “you are what you eat,” is especially true when coupled with your sleep health. Consuming a diverse diet full of fresh fruits, vegetables, and lean protein, like fish and meat, benefits nearly all aspects of your mind and body and supports the natural production of melatonin, the hormone behind your circadian rhythm. The key foods Dr. Breus recommends include carbohydrates, foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, and fruits such as kiwis and Montmorency tart cherries, which already contain melatonin. Dr. Ruiz suggests avoiding foods that cause acid reflux and heartburn, which would keep you up at night anyway and to stop eating at least two hours before your bedtime.

More: The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Recipes

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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